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翻译费率计算器



The rates / fees a freelance translator needs to charge depend on various factors, including the speed at which he or she works, the income he or she desires, work-related expenses and so on. Use the online calculator below to determine your own minimum rates, given your working speed, expenses and lifestyle objectives.

Please enter your information
每年业务相关成本1:
年收入目标2:
每周工作时间(小时):
翻译占总工作时间百分比: %
每小时翻译量43:
每年度假时间(周):
Instructions for using this calculator:

a)您可以使用任意货币进行计算,计算结果将与您所选用的货币种类相符。
b)请输入每年业务相关成本。包括:硬件、软件、网络连接、办公地点、业务保险、会费、税费、培训、研讨会等花费。
c)请输入年收入目标。包括:生活费用、储蓄、个人保险、可支配收入等,请输入税前数额。
d)请输入每周工作时间。
e)请输入翻译占总工作时间的百分比。非翻译工作包括:与客户沟通(电子邮件、电话、聊天)、报价、计划、准备及处理文件和文档、开票、记账、推销、杂务、培训、休息等。
注意:若您每天工作八个小时,其中两个小时用于非翻译工作,则翻译占总工作时间的百分比为6/8=75%。
f)请输入使用翻译辅助工具并考虑相关因素后的平均翻译量。
您可以使用字符数、字数、行数、页数等单位;计算结果与您选择的单位相符。
请填写专用于翻译时的每小时翻译量,因为翻译占总工作时间百分比一项中已经减除了非翻译工作的时间。
g)请输入每年度假时间。其中不仅包括娱乐时间,还包括暂停工作,花费在研讨会、座谈会、会议等活动上的时间。
h)单击“提交”后将计算出您的年翻译总量和达到既定收入目标所需的单位费率。请根据每个工作的预计花费时间与平均时间之比调整单位费率。
i)计算结果下方有两个链接:第一个链至您在简介中输入的费率,而第二个链至全网站的平均费率统计页面。费率按语言对列出。
Footnotes:
1. 电脑、硬件、软件、网络连接、办公地点、业务保险、会费、税费等。
2. 生活费用、储蓄、个人保险、可支配收入等。
3. 使用翻译辅助工具并考虑相关因素后的平均翻译量。
4. 您可以使用字符数、字数、行数、页数等单位。
5. 这是您以平均速度翻译所需征收的单位费率。请根据预计花费时间调整单位费率。


Notes / additional sources of information on rates:

Comments

Discussion about how to set your rates as a translator.


话题中的页数:   [1 2 3 4] >
Translator rates calculator

l Gaston l  Identity Verified
Local time: 11:00
Afrikaans南非语译成Ancient Hebrew古希伯来语
+ ...
Article on determining rates and fees Jun 4, 2010

The article Determining your rates and fees as a translator is meant to provide translators with helpful tips in answering the question "What rates should I charge?"

The article is a joint project of ProZ.com members and guests; all translators are invited to contribute freely and add their experience.


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Krzysztof Kajetanowicz  Identity Verified
波兰
Local time: 16:00
English英语译成Polish波兰语
+ ...
note Jun 4, 2010

I admit that to the extent that the article compiles what most people here would say on the subject, it's a good summary.

However, I think it's a mistake to focus on the cost of living and what the translator "would like" to earn.

Economics a cruel science. Your aspirations and needs are hardly relevant. What counts are your options, as well as the client's options.

If you're not making enough, you can demand more. If the client has other options, you won't make more. If you thus find yourself unable to make enough money translating, are you able to do something else and make more?

If not, then living costs are a poor reference point. You will prefer to make too little than to make nothing. The cost of food is not a cost you have to bear in order to translate. It's a cost you'll bear regardless. If you choose between translating for little and doing nothing for nothing, unless your country has a generous unemployment benefit, you'll choose to translate for little.

If yes, very well - but then again, the cost of living is not a good reference. Rather, you look at the fact that the buyer is willing to pay because they won't get a much better deal (price/quality-wise) somewhere else.

Let the flaming begin.


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Dawn Montague  Identity Verified
Local time: 10:00
German德语译成English英语
+ ...
Krzysztof is partly right, but it's not the whole story Jun 4, 2010

Although Krzysztof is partly right (the realities of economics can be cruel indeed), it is not the whole story. From experience, I can tell you that if you can deliver top notch quality and service that pleases top notch clients (and you market yourself effectively to them), you will be able to say no to the low payers. It's as simple as that. It takes time and hard work to get to that point, but it can be done. I would suggest also reading Corinne McKay's blog post entitled "Secrets of six-figure translators" at http://thoughtsontranslation.com/2008/11/12/secrets-of-six-figure-translators/, or any of Danilo Nogueira's articles on translator economics such as this one: http://www.proz.com/translation-articles/articles/298/1/Translation-Economics-101 or this one: http://www.proz.com/translation-articles/articles/327/1/-Are-you-Prepared-to-Meet-Your-Client?.

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Felipe severino jendrysiak
巴西
Local time: 11:00
English英语译成Portuguese葡萄牙语
Value your work and dictate your rates Jul 29, 2010

Hey,
I agree with Dawn,
Quality comes with price and further more agencies only offers extremely low rates and demanding top quality translations because translators accepts such imperative. Do not translate for little if you are a real qualified translator. If the professional values the career you won't subject yourself to work for little. DO NOT WORK FOR LITTLE. If everyone simply refuses to accept low payers (agencies) they will eventually rethink the way a translation work worth. If you translator prefer to work for little please do something like working in a bar. For certain that will be less distressing with less responsibility.


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AGDANE
Local time: 00:00
English英语译成Danish丹麦语
+ ...
Yes Oct 2, 2010

Krzysztof Kajetanowicz wrote:

However, I think it's a mistake to focus on the cost of living and what the translator "would like" to earn.

Economics a cruel science. Your aspirations and needs are hardly relevant. What counts are your options, as well as the client's options.

If you're not making enough, you can demand more. If the client has other options, you won't make more. If you thus find yourself unable to make enough money translating, are you able to do something else and make more?

If not, then living costs are a poor reference point. You will prefer to make too little than to make nothing. The cost of food is not a cost you have to bear in order to translate. It's a cost you'll bear regardless. If you choose between translating for little and doing nothing for nothing, unless your country has a generous unemployment benefit, you'll choose to translate for little.

If yes, very well - but then again, the cost of living is not a good reference. Rather, you look at the fact that the buyer is willing to pay because they won't get a much better deal (price/quality-wise) somewhere else.

Let the flaming begin.


That is precisely right. The only thing that determines the price is what the buyer is willing to pay.

Although of course, in the long course living costs should theoretically affect the rate for translation, because translators being paid less that they could subside on would supposedly leave the profession (or sleep under bridges), and thereby lower supply relative to demand. However, that is not really relevant to price setting for the individual who needs the projects.

[Edited at 2010-10-02 00:23 GMT]


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jferedo  Identity Verified
Local time: 00:00
Hungarian匈牙利语译成English英语
+ ...
Felipe is absolutely right. Nov 9, 2010

Too many newcomers believe that they are translators (on the basis of speaking more than one language) and accept jobs for next to nothing. Stick to your price. If agencies want quality, they will pay the price or ask for proofreading. Never accept proofreading without seeing a sample. My long-term customers all went through this and now I have no problem (or not too much).

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Virgo Fernando
印度尼西亚
Local time: 21:00
English英语译成Indonesian印度尼西亚语
+ ...
good to read... Jan 2, 2011

all yours are "good sentences"... let's say I'm not so much of a good translator... and still trying to step into this translator's world, seeking hope for a better future, doing what I THINK I could do.. reading felipe's and dawn's has given me some sort of hope and self-confidence, though krzysztof's might also be right to the contexts that in the real life, things just don't go well by doing the calculation of how much do you want to earn or else... so, I'm not saying which one is preferable... all of your sentences are good to read and learn...

cheers

-V-


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John Holloway  Identity Verified
荷兰
Local time: 16:00
正式会员 (自2010)
Dutch荷兰语译成English英语
+ ...
rate per hour in the calculator Jan 27, 2011

If hourly rate was included it would be handy. This also lets you see when you should stop translating and take up garbage removal or similar as the rate´s better! I think a good sign is that, provided your overheads are low (and one must remember to depreciate capital investment over 3 to 5 years), translating can deliver a livable (freelance) income - comparable, say to teaching, nursing and other (somewhat underpaid) professions. It´s a viable departure point, from which to build a (somewhat) higher income as you get better at it. As a (re-) starter in the field I find this consoling! At least it´s a field in which there´s constant demand!

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Morten Alme

English英语译成Norwegian挪威语
Thank you for a good input May 27, 2011

Krzysztof Kajetanowicz wrote:

I admit that to the extent that the article compiles what most people here would say on the subject, it's a good summary.

However, I think it's a mistake to focus on the cost of living and what the translator "would like" to earn.

Economics a cruel science. Your aspirations and needs are hardly relevant. What counts are your options, as well as the client's options.

If you're not making enough, you can demand more. If the client has other options, you won't make more. If you thus find yourself unable to make enough money translating, are you able to do something else and make more?

If not, then living costs are a poor reference point. You will prefer to make too little than to make nothing. The cost of food is not a cost you have to bear in order to translate. It's a cost you'll bear regardless. If you choose between translating for little and doing nothing for nothing, unless your country has a generous unemployment benefit, you'll choose to translate for little.

If yes, very well - but then again, the cost of living is not a good reference. Rather, you look at the fact that the buyer is willing to pay because they won't get a much better deal (price/quality-wise) somewhere else.

Let the flaming begin.


It seems hard to put a price on words. As a freelancer new to this business, some good advice is highly appreciated....


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Samuel Murray  Identity Verified
荷兰
Local time: 16:00
正式会员 (自2006)
English英语译成Afrikaans南非语
+ ...
At the risk of repeating what the wiki article says May 27, 2011

Moral26 wrote:
It seems hard to put a price on words. As a freelancer new to this business, some good advice is highly appreciated...


Options:

1. Charge what other people in your language combination charge (for that, you need to do some research into what other people charge).

2.1 Assume (as a beginner) that you can do 300 words per hour and that you would be busy 3 hours a day, 3 days a week, 3 weeks a month.
2.2 Decide how much money you would like to earn per month, and then multiply that by 3 (to make up for taxes, insurance, etc).
2.3 Then... then divide that amount by the number of words that you would be able to translate in that month.

3. Let your clients decide how much they want to pay. Say something like "I don't have a single rate for all clients -- why don't you start by telling me what you think is reasonable". Good agencies will offer you what is reasonable, bad agencies will take advantage of you, but either way, you'll learn a lot about money and the value of translation.

Lastly, find a good average between all of the above, play with the numbers, and adjust your expectations accordingly.

Oh, and don't forget that some clients in some countries are willing to pay more (or are unwilling to pay less) than some clients in some other countries. And don't forget that once you've asked a certain rate for a certain client, it is nearly impossible to increase it later (except a little bit).




[Edited at 2011-05-27 07:39 GMT]


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Morten Alme

English英语译成Norwegian挪威语
Thanks for advice. May 28, 2011

Samuel Murray wrote:

Moral26 wrote:
It seems hard to put a price on words. As a freelancer new to this business, some good advice is highly appreciated...


Options:

1. Charge what other people in your language combination charge (for that, you need to do some research into what other people charge).

2.1 Assume (as a beginner) that you can do 300 words per hour and that you would be busy 3 hours a day, 3 days a week, 3 weeks a month.
2.2 Decide how much money you would like to earn per month, and then multiply that by 3 (to make up for taxes, insurance, etc).
2.3 Then... then divide that amount by the number of words that you would be able to translate in that month.

3. Let your clients decide how much they want to pay. Say something like "I don't have a single rate for all clients -- why don't you start by telling me what you think is reasonable". Good agencies will offer you what is reasonable, bad agencies will take advantage of you, but either way, you'll learn a lot about money and the value of translation.

Lastly, find a good average between all of the above, play with the numbers, and adjust your expectations accordingly.

Oh, and don't forget that some clients in some countries are willing to pay more (or are unwilling to pay less) than some clients in some other countries. And don't forget that once you've asked a certain rate for a certain client, it is nearly impossible to increase it later (except a little bit).




[Edited at 2011-05-27 07:39 GMT]


Thanks for the good advice. I saw Svens price list, and it gave me good pointers. Though I reckon medical translations are a lot more time consuming and technical than mere web content, literary or catalogue content.

Good point in letting the client put up an offer first, and then compare with the prices I already have.

I do remember being able to write about 4-6 pages a day while rewriting a short story collection a few years ago. And then I set forth to translate the main story to Norwegian. It was the same there. Between 3-6 pages a day.

I gather I would be able to do at least a 1000 to 1200 words a day on the clients projects. And I range my prices from 9 to 13 eurocents per source word.

This seems to be something that I have looked for a long time, while struggling with my own writing. Except for deadlines, you are your own boss.

Again, thanks for good advice.


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Gabriela Hebin  Identity Verified
美国
Local time: 10:00
正式会员 (自2002)
Spanish西班牙语译成English英语
+ ...
300 words per hour, 3 hours a day, 3 days a week... really? Jun 11, 2011

Please, just look at the default values on this formula.

A newbie translator might see this formula and expect to support his/her family's lifestyle by translating during only 70% of their "working" time, yet expects to do so by only translating 300 words per hour. Of course he/she feels it is perfectly reasonable to expect 4 weeks a year of what amounts to a paid vacation, and then to only work for 3 hours a day, 3 days a week.

Hello??? ON WHAT PLANET can you support yourself working 3 hours a day, 3 days a week, 48 weeks a year, if you're only good enough to produce 300 words an hour?

THEN someone else chimes in agreeing that they can only manage to produce some 1000-1200 words per day, so the newbie feels justified in the presumptions.

REALITY CHECK: 1000 words per day is NOT a professional rate of production! All of the translators who I work with can produce a minimum of 4000 words per day, some of them up to 8000, so let's get real here. Step it up.

What is the amount that you are willing to earn while you sit at home in front of your lapton in your jammies?
What is the value of being able to watch your own children rather than send them off to be "cared for" by strangers?
How cool is it to be able to take a break from your emails to move your laundry from the washer to the dryer?
Or to water your garden between assignments?
What is the value of NOT having to wear a suit and tie (or nylons and heels)?
Of NOT having to commute X number of hours each week?
Of NOT having to waste the the gas and wear and tear on your car?
How amazing is it to be in touch with people from all over the world and not have to sit in some fluorescent-lit office listening to some yahoo spouting the usual office gossip and politics while you pretend to care?
And what could be better than to avoid ALL of those things and still earn MANY times more than what an office worker earns?

To me, that kind of freedom is priceless.

Please enlighten me, even in the most Socialist of societies, since when does 300 words per hour X 3 hours a day X 3 days a week constitute an effort to earn a living? A business owner always works MORE than a full-time employee, not less. Greater freedom only comes with greater responsibility.

Enough said.

I'm sure this post will create hate mail, but so what? I'm sitting at home making my own coffee and listening to the TV while I laugh at the flames from the newbies who can only translate 1000 words per day.


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Arianne Farah  Identity Verified
加拿大
Local time: 10:00
正式会员 (自2008)
English英语译成French法语
I read Samuel's post another way Jun 11, 2011

@Gabriela - from what I understand of Samuel's post he's not using the 3x3x3 as what a newbie should be aiming for but rather the volume one can realistically expect to obtain at the beginning of a career, the rest of the time spent prospecting new clients and firing off CVs. If a newbie makes his calculations based on a 40-hour work week chances are he/she won't book enough work to fill those 40 hours and the budget will be way off!

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Daniel Grau  Identity Verified
阿根廷
English英语译成Spanish西班牙语
Using a similar method to the rates calculator... Jun 11, 2011

... in this BMI chart:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Body_mass_index

I just determined I am over 2 meters tall.


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apk12  Identity Verified
德国
Local time: 16:00
English英语译成German德语
+ ...
Oha? Costs of living irrelevant? Jun 11, 2011

Krzysztof Kajetanowicz wrote:

I admit that to the extent that the article compiles what most people here would say on the subject, it's a good summary.

However, I think it's a mistake to focus on the cost of living and what the translator "would like" to earn. ...



No, I don't agree. Economists may think what they want to think and count whatever they count. If they forget this fact - that it should be a living translator, not his skeleton - actually the costs of living in the given target language country is a cost they HAVE to embed in their calculation, the translator won't deliver a professional translation from right of his grave.

The consequences, if economists forget that, are... translations starting world trips. With expectable quality afterwards. Well...




[Edited at 2011-06-11 13:06 GMT]


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